Search This Blog

Tuesday, March 04, 2008

A FINAL ROLL OF THE DICE: R.I.P. GARY GYGAX, CO-CREATOR OF DUNGEONS & DRAGONS (1938-2008)

One of the guys who gave virgins and shut-ins a reason to live has passed on, leaving a legacy of dice-rolling basement-dwellers with arthritic, clawlike hands in his wake (I kid! I kid!). I was into D&D for about fifteen minutes and bailed out once I discovered girls, but the game has brought great entertainment to millions for over three decades and allowed what may otherwise have been stifled imaginations to grow and thrive, so I have to salute Mr. Gygax (to say nothing of offering a belated "thank you" for unleashing legions of horny and occasionally very cute gamer chicks upon the unsuspecting public). From the Associated Press:

Dungeons & Dragons co-creator Gary Gygax dies at 69
By EMILY FREDRIX | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MILWAUKEE - Gary Gygax, who co-created the game Dungeons & Dragons and helped start the role-playing phenomenon, died Tuesday morning at his home in Lake Geneva. He was 69. He had been suffering from health problems for several years, including an abdominal aneurysm, said his wife, Gail Gygax. Gygax and co-creator Dave Arneson developed the fantasy role-playing game in 1974. It became one of the best-selling games ever and influenced video games, books and movies.

Gygax' wife said he always enjoyed hearing from the game's legion of devoted fans about how Dungeons & Dragons influenced their lives. Many would stop by the family's home in Lake Geneva, which is about 55 miles southwest of Milwaukee, she said. "It really meant a lot to him to hear from people from over the years about how he helped them become a doctor, a lawyer, a policeman, what he gave them," Gail Gygax said. "He really enjoyed that."

Dungeons & Dragons players create fictional characters for themselves and describe their adventures with the help of complicated rules and unusually shaped dice. The quintessential geek pastime, it spawned a wealth of copycat games and later inspired a whole genre of computer games that are still growing in popularity.

Gygax had been in declining health for several years but as recently as January he hosted weekly games of Dungeons & Dragons at their home, Gail Gygax said.

Funeral arrangements are pending. In addition to his wife, Gygax is survived by six children.

3 comments:

Scott said...

Alas, poor Gary -- he failed his last saving throw.

Anonymous said...

He totally should've invested more points in constitution.

Mel

Anonymous said...

CLERIC!